Le Monde

Bridal Bouquet Trends 2021

By
Lisa Tant
Photo courtesy of Juan Villanueva
Photo courtesy of Stock Florist
Photo courtesy of The Wild Pansy, Photo by Derek O’Donnell
Photo courtesy of The Bloom Room

A highlight of any wedding - grand or intimate - is the bride’s bouquet. This year, as ceremonies become smaller and often move outdoors, bouquets are no less treasured. A desire for sustainability and environmental awareness in smaller gatherings have introduced new trends in bridal bouquets such as more garden variety flowers, foliage and softer neutral shades. We asked four of our top Fleuristes what’s trending in their city: 

NEW YORK – Juan Villanueva of Villanueva Designs

Top flower pick: “Right now, I’m really into Japanese Ranunculus – and any colour really, they are all so individually unique and impeccably grown. (And with a price tag to match!) They also blend well with my top trend.”

Leading trend or theme: “I feel that for 2021, we are still going to see a push forward with the trend of preserved, bleached and dyed floral as we all look to more sustainable and long lasting solutions in cut flowers. Also the community is really making aggressive strides to reduce and eliminate the use of floral foam which is harmful to humans and the environment. This said, I feel that in terms of style, open airy bouquets (full of movement and texture) are key in 2021 – so we are putting the “pave poof” on the shelf for a bit.”

Top colour pick: “I’m really feeling warm washed-out neutral tones this year – whites, creams, taupes, touches of blush (throw in a raspberry or salmon-toned Japanese Ranunculus) and maybe gold accent. Fresh and clean as we move into this new year. But also I don’t think that we’ve seen the last of that ever-popular ‘millennial pink’ and blush tones.”

Personal bouquet favourite: “After 2020, I’m looking at flower design a bit differently, and I’m sure I’m not alone in that. I think it is a great time for floral designers and clients to venture boldly. So don’t be afraid to just have fun with your florals, use whatever flowers, preserves, plant material and /or objects that you like and make your heart sing!”


ESSEX, UK - Sam Raindle of Stock Florist

Top flower pick: “We are seeing a lot of pampas (grass) with a mix of greenery in our bouquets. The delicate pampas grass with bold structured flowers creates the perfect summer bouquet. Floral arrangements using both dried and fresh flowers are becoming extremely popular. 

Leading trend or theme: “We are seeing more whimsical romantic themed weddings with an organic look. Large installations using fresh foliage and large stemmed flowers create a woodland theme, lovely for any statement wedding.”

Top colour pick: “Soft and subtle is this year’s trend. People are obsessed with delicate flowers using pleasing colour palettes.”

Bouquet favourite: “Many brides are wanting larger bouquets that are trailing forward to add a major statement to a luxury dress.”

A WEDDING STAPLE - Ancient civilizations believed that carrying a bouquet of herbs and spices on one’s wedding day welcomed good luck and a bright future for the new couple. In Victorian times, bouquets became grander and ornamental with specific flowers to denote a bride’s social stature. In modern times, bouquets express the bride’s personal style with her bouquet being the centerpiece for a themed wedding, whether that be country chic or downtown glam girl. During the pandemic, weddings have shifted radically but the bouquet remains a staple. When we get to the other side, we believe that weddings will become more important than ever as people turn to celebrate joining families at major life events. In the coming years, we’ll be looking out for spectacular oversized bouquets in brilliant hues and unexpected blooms. 

A highlight of any wedding - grand or intimate - is the bride’s bouquet. This year, as ceremonies become smaller and often move outdoors, bouquets are no less treasured. A desire for sustainability and environmental awareness in smaller gatherings have introduced new trends in bridal bouquets such as more garden variety flowers, foliage and softer neutral shades. We asked four of our top Fleuristes what’s trending in their city: 

Photo courtesy of Juan Villanueva
Photo courtesy of Juan Villanueva
Photo courtesy of Stock Florist
Photo courtesy of Stock Florist

NEW YORK – Juan Villanueva of Villanueva Designs

Top flower pick: “Right now, I’m really into Japanese Ranunculus – and any colour really, they are all so individually unique and impeccably grown. (And with a price tag to match!) They also blend well with my top trend.”

Leading trend or theme: “I feel that for 2021, we are still going to see a push forward with the trend of preserved, bleached and dyed floral as we all look to more sustainable and long lasting solutions in cut flowers. Also the community is really making aggressive strides to reduce and eliminate the use of floral foam which is harmful to humans and the environment. This said, I feel that in terms of style, open airy bouquets (full of movement and texture) are key in 2021 – so we are putting the “pave poof” on the shelf for a bit.”

Top colour pick: “I’m really feeling warm washed-out neutral tones this year – whites, creams, taupes, touches of blush (throw in a raspberry or salmon-toned Japanese Ranunculus) and maybe gold accent. Fresh and clean as we move into this new year. But also I don’t think that we’ve seen the last of that ever-popular ‘millennial pink’ and blush tones.”

Personal bouquet favourite: “After 2020, I’m looking at flower design a bit differently, and I’m sure I’m not alone in that. I think it is a great time for floral designers and clients to venture boldly. So don’t be afraid to just have fun with your florals, use whatever flowers, preserves, plant material and /or objects that you like and make your heart sing!”


ESSEX, UK - Sam Raindle of Stock Florist

Top flower pick: “We are seeing a lot of pampas (grass) with a mix of greenery in our bouquets. The delicate pampas grass with bold structured flowers creates the perfect summer bouquet. Floral arrangements using both dried and fresh flowers are becoming extremely popular. 

Leading trend or theme: “We are seeing more whimsical romantic themed weddings with an organic look. Large installations using fresh foliage and large stemmed flowers create a woodland theme, lovely for any statement wedding.”

Top colour pick: “Soft and subtle is this year’s trend. People are obsessed with delicate flowers using pleasing colour palettes.”

Bouquet favourite: “Many brides are wanting larger bouquets that are trailing forward to add a major statement to a luxury dress.”

A WEDDING STAPLE - Ancient civilizations believed that carrying a bouquet of herbs and spices on one’s wedding day welcomed good luck and a bright future for the new couple. In Victorian times, bouquets became grander and ornamental with specific flowers to denote a bride’s social stature. In modern times, bouquets express the bride’s personal style with her bouquet being the centerpiece for a themed wedding, whether that be country chic or downtown glam girl. During the pandemic, weddings have shifted radically but the bouquet remains a staple. When we get to the other side, we believe that weddings will become more important than ever as people turn to celebrate joining families at major life events. In the coming years, we’ll be looking out for spectacular oversized bouquets in brilliant hues and unexpected blooms. 

Photo courtesy of The Wild Pansy, Photo by Derek O’Donnell
Photo courtesy of The Wild Pansy, Photo by Derek O’Donnell
Photo courtesy of The Bloom Room
Photo courtesy of The Bloom Room

TORONTO – Deanna Balmer of The Wild Pansy

Top flower pick: “For those tying the knot in spring- expect tulips, freesia, hyacinth, ranunculus and peonies in late spring/early summer. In the summer, expect lots of dainty blooms like Queen Anne’s lace, larkspur, garden roses and sweet peas. As we transition into late summer/early fall, there will be loads of dahlias, amaranth and zinnias in fun colours.”

Personal bouquet favourite: “The classic fan favourite flowers are ranunculus, peonies and dahlias. Pay homage to Mother Nature and seek out flowers that are seasonally available- you won’t regret it. I love using more unique varieties of blooms grown by smaller-scale Ontario flower farmers that aren’t readily available at the larger wholesalers.”

Leading trend or theme: “Couples are eager to move on to the next chapter of their lives and some will have to opt for a smaller, more intimate micro wedding or even elopement this year. We are seeing backyard and cottage weddings which call for a simpler take on wedding flowers in some instances. Brides may choose a smaller sized bridal bouquet full of the season’s best blooms. More brides are understanding that using seasonal flowers is the way to go given that, like nearly every other industry, there has been some interruption in the imported flower industry.”

“And just because you can’t have a big party like you initially planned, it doesn’t mean you have to give up your flower dreams! Opt for that jaw dropping ceremony installation or big bountiful centrepieces that may have fallen outside your intended budget if you were having a wedding with 100 guests or more.”

JOHANNESBURG - Cindy Lee du Toit of The Bloom Room

Top flower pick: “Proteas have never gone out of fashion here.”

Leading trend or theme: “The bold and the beautiful with a less-is-more theme is trending in South Africa. Florals are bold but only using a few as feature flowers (protea, hydrangea, dahlias, O’Hara roses) mixed with whimsical filler flowers and finishing off with greens. Greenery and floral table runners are also big here, as well as hanging floral and greenery installations.”

Top colour pick: “Neutrals with bold accents. For example, soft creams and blush flowers with black candlesticks and decor. I also love to see blush with pops of burgundy.” 

Personal bouquet favourite: “We are loving whimsical loose hand-tied bouquets using bold florals like proteas, peonies, ranunculus, cymbidiums, hydrangeas, dahlias and lots of interesting greens.”

Photo courtesy of The Bloom Room
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